OVPR Small Business Development

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This is a collection of Small Business Development reports from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research.

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    Small Business Development 2009: Cornell's Research Serves the Region and Beyond
    (Office of the Vice Provost for Research, 2009-01)
    The tangible benefits of a university's research are extraordinary. When Cornell faculty teach and perform services for the community within their domain of expertise, we immediately understand these benefits. But when Cornell faculty conduct research and that research materializes into a cure for a disease, a better medical procedure, a new green product, or a faster and more compact computer, we connect with the extraordinary potential of academic research. The path of the "what if..." and "I wonder why..." that begins in the laboratory, translated into discoveries and inventions, and then transferred into products by small businesses leads us to a deeper appreciation for how university research brings a multitude of improvements to our daily lives. Even more, by the time the research leaves the laboratory bench—en route to becoming a product—it has also created an optimal learning experience for many undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral students and some community members along its path. These are frequently the people, sometimes along with faculty, who bring the innovations to market in the form of a small company that, in turn, hires employees—some from Cornell's research labs after completing their degrees and some from the community and beyond. This process—technology transfer—completes the research connection.
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    Small Business Development 2004: Cornell's Research Serves the Region
    (Cornell University Office of the Vice Provost for Research, 2004)
    Cornell's research, scholarship, and creativity enrich human lives through programs and efforts in technology transfer and outreach. New knowledge is shared, social problems are aided or solved, new jobs become available, new products emerge, new industry sectors form, high technology and other new companies start, and the economy is stimulated. This process of transferring university-based knowledge takes place through Cornell's faculty, students, and staff--whether a graduate is joining a company or starting a company; a faculty member is inventing a new product or making a discovery; a staff member is offering a new service based on Cornell research or negotiating a contract. The university culture produces many rewards for the public. When new companies are formed in the community--direct spin-offs of Cornell technology and start-ups by Cornell faculty, staff, students, or graduates--not only does economic development of the region advance but also diversity in the state's economy. More high technology jobs and more revenue result. With $505 million (FY 2003) in research expenditures and with start-up companies translating the results of Cornell's research and technology into products and services, Cornell's potential for serving the region through economic development and serving the public in new and essential ways continues to grow.
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    Small Business Development 2002: Cornell's Research Serves the Region
    (Cornell University Office of the Vice Provost for Research, 2002)
    Cornell's research, scholarship, and creativity is immensely beneficial to the public. Through the university's programs and efforts in technology transfer and outreach, human lives are enriched--new knowledge is shared, social problems are aided or solved, new jobs become available, new products emerge, and the economy is stimulated. Technology transfer occurs in many ways. For example, whenever a Cornell graduate leaves the university and takes a place in the world of industry--whether joining a company or starting a company--a transfer of university-based knowledge takes place. New companies in the region--direct spin-offs of Cornell technology and startups by Cornell faculty, staff, students, or graduates--contribute directly to the economic development of the region. These companies create new industry sectors (usually in high technology fields thereby helping to diversify the state's economy), more jobs, and more revenue for the region and the state. They translate the results of Cornell's research and technology into products and services, thus serving the public in essential ways. With $415 million (FY 2001) in research expenditures, Cornell's potential for serving the region through economic development continues to grow, particularly as the university persists in making the process of transitioning from the research bench to the formation of small businesses easier.
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    Small Business Development 2000: Cornell's Research Serves the Region
    (Cornell University Office of the Vice Provost for Research, 2000)
    The benefits of Cornell's research, scholarship, and creativity touch the public in many ways through technology transfer and outreach. Spin-off companies are a direct benefit to the economic development of the region, creating more jobs and revenues. With $377 million (FY 1999) in research expenditures, Cornell's potential for serving the region through economic development continues to grow. One of the university's goals is to make the transition from research advances to the formation of small businesses easier. Cornell's partnership with Tompkins County in establishing the Business Innovation Center and Cornell's own Office of Economic Development have created a supportive and nurturing climate for small business development on campus and in the community. Cornell's Research Serves the Region: Small Business Development 2000 illustrates how technology transfer and outreach are achieved through small business development. It documents 85 small businesses that have emerged as a result of Cornell's extensive academic resources--its people, research, and facilities. These businesses employ more than 4,200 people in the region, and they have $405 million in annual revenues with only 13 companies revealing revenues
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    Small Business Development 2006: Cornell's Research Serves the Region
    (Cornell University Office of the Vice Provost for Research, 2006-06)
    Cornell's Research Serves the Region and Beyond: Small Business Development covers founded by Cornell faculty, staff, students, or alumni. Located in Tompkins County are nanotechnology and biotechnology firms; high-tech materials testing, food development and testing, and veterinary testing laboratories; software development firms; and many others. Examples of their products include fuel cell technology for portable electronic devices; foodservice and nutrition services software for the world's education, entertainment, and medical industries; MEMs technology that is applicable in the automotive, biotechnology, and consumer electronics industries; blood flowmeters for medical research and surgical use; specialty chemicals and materials development covering a wide range of high-tech uses; and food products. A community such as this helps to sustain a solid economic base in the region, and at the same time, advances growth and diversity in the state's economy. This publication also includes other small companies that take Cornell's research to practical fruition. These are companies that licensed Cornell technologies but are located beyond the region. It also includes Weill Cornell Medical College's recent spin-offs. Cornell's Research Serves the Region and Beyond: Small Business Development illustrates how technology transfer is achieved through small business development. It documents 110 small businesses with ties to Cornell's extensive academic resources--its people, research, and facilities. It offers many examples of how Cornell's research serves the local community, as well as state, national, and global communities. With $561 million (FY 2005) in research expenditures and start-up companies translating research and technology into products and services, Cornell's potential for serving the region through economic development as well as serving the public in new and essential ways is extraordinary.