Sustainable Models for University-based Scholarly Publishing Workshop

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    Incubating Open Journals in Economics
    Getz, Malcolm (Internet-First University Press, 2005-10-20)
    As open journals become intellectual successes, they will come to substitute for subscription-based journals. The entry of two new journals specializing in economic theory, one a commercial subscription journal and the other an open journal, stimulates the question: What does a new journal require in order to achieve intellectual impact? Regressing the ISI Impact Factor for 141 journals on attributes of the journals estimates their relative importance. The intellectual reputations of the editors and of the authors? prior work along with the number of libraries that hold the title are positively associated with the journal?s Impact Factor. Using the attributes of the new journals in the estimated relationships yields a forecast of the Impact Factor for the new journals. An open journal has the advantage of being immediately as accessible everywhere on the Internet as though held by many libraries. Its forecast impact is comparable to the journals with the highest impact in this specialty. Some open journals are able to attract outstanding editors and authors with the natural advantage of universal access without charge.
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    Immigrants and the Community: Community Perspectives
    Pfeffer, Max J.; Parra, Pilar A. (Cornell University, 2005-10)
    As related in our previous reports, the populations of many rural New York communities are becoming more ethnically diverse. This diversification became especially noticeable in the 1990s with the upsurge in Mexican migration. When agricultural production is found in or near communities, immigrants often first come there as farmworkers. As indicated in our previous report, our research has shown that after a fairly short time (less than 10 years), many of the workers leave seasonal farm employment for more steady work in agriculture or other industries. For these workers a departure from agricultural employment often does not mean that they leave the communities where they work. In fact, many of them told us they would like to settle here provided they can find work. The increasing tendency for Mexican immigrants to settle in the U.S. has been observed in many regions and in urban as well as rural areas. Diversifying communities are faced with a range of opportunities and challenges associated with this population change. However, this situation may be a source of confusion in communities that have only recently experienced increased immigrant settlement. The purpose of our study has been to document changes associated with the ethnic diversification of rural communities and to provide a factual foundation for community deliberations about how to capture opportunities and address challenges associated with this population change. Description: Fourth in a series based on the research project "Integrating the Needs of Immigrant Workers and Rural Communities," which attempts to inform New York communities about the nature and consequences of increasing immigrant settlement.
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    Immigrants and the Community: Former Farmworkers
    Pfeffer, Max J.; Para, Pilar A. (Cornell University, 2005-09)
    Many upstate New York communities have experienced population loss and decline in the last decade. Increasing numbers of immigrants have settled in many of these communities, which poses possible community development challenges and opportunities. As we reported earlier (Immigrants and the Community: Farmworkers with Families), a growing proportion of farmworkers with families is settling in rural communities. This trend may create both opportunities and problems for rural communities, but how can we anticipate what those might be? In an effort to understand the integration of new immigrants into rural communities, we interviewed former farmworkers and other community members in five upstate townships. A look at the experiences of former farmworkers who have resided in the community for some time can provide some valuable insights. Because each community must address these issues in its own way, this report is intended to make communities aware of changes in their populations and highlight issues they may choose to address. Description: Third in a series based on the research project "Integrating the Needs of Immigrant Workers and Rural Communities," which attempts to inform New York communities about the nature and consequences of increasing immigrant settlement.
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    Immigrants and the Community: Farmworkers with Families
    Parra, Pilar A.; Pfeffer, Max J. (Cornell University, 2005-04)
    America's hired farm workforce has changed considerably in the last decade. The most apparent change has been its "latinization" during the past two decades. This is largely a consequence of large numbers of Mexicans coming to the United States to work. Although Mexican immigrants work in numerous industries across the American landscape, they are especially important in agriculture. There has been a growing tendency of farmworkers to settle in rural communities together with their immediate family. But how and to what extent does community integration occur? How do foreigners who have little familiarity with American culture become integrated into the community? Answers to these questions have practical importance to farmers interested in retaining their workforce, service providers working to improve farmworker well-being and communities interested in helping the new residents contribute to community development. To help us understand the factors that both promote and limit the integration of immigrants into rural communities, we chose for study five New York agricultural communities in different economic and social contexts that have relied heavily on hired farm labor. Each community has a minority population of some significance and a history of immigrant farmworkers settling there.
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    Open Scholarship and Research Universities
    Getz, Malcolm (Internet-First University Press, 2005-05-18)
    Compare the cost per article for publication in commercial journals, not-profit journals, and open-access journals. For universities that support open-archives and open-access journal management software as part of standard university infrastructure, the financial cost of hosting an additional journal is quite low. Scholars who commit to editing and promoting a journal need to focus primarily on the intellectual tasks with little concern for finances.
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    Project Euclid and the ArXiv: Complimentary and Contrasting Elements for Sustainability
    Hickerson, H. Thomas (2005-01-10T14:00:02Z)
    New models of sustainability are evolving for the development and dissemination of scholarly information, but viable options are dependent on stable organizational foundations and sound managerial and financial models. My remarks today are not designed to provide an overarching vision for the future of scholarly publishing, but are intended to elucidate factors critical to the success of such visions. I am pleased to have this opportunity to review with you strategies presently being employed by the electronic publishing program of the Cornell University Library. I will focus on two particular research publishing endeavors, Euclid and the physics, mathematics, and computer science e-print arXiv. These two alternative publishing instances offer us a lens through which to analyze elements critical to sustainability. Their very different operational models illustrate differences in sustainability strategies, and yet there are important similarities between the two.
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    Immigrants and the Community
    Pfeffer, Max J.; Para, Pilar A. (Cornell University, 2004-11)
    Many upstate New York communities have experienced population loss and decline in the last decade. Increasing numbers of immigrants have settled in many of these communities, which poses possible community development challenges and opportunities. Because each community must address these issues in its own way, this report is intended to make communities aware of changes in their populations and highlight issues they may choose to address.
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    Building an E-Publishing Model from the Stakeholders on Up
    Gibbons, Susan (Internet-First University Press, 2004-06-01)
    Develop a business model to adapt DSpace for e-publishing..
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    Open-Access Scholarly Publishing
    Getz, Malcolm (Internet-First University Press, 2004-06-01)
    Can open-access scholarship succeed? Should open-access scholarship succeed? The goals are to lower costs and increase access. Four topics are reviewed: 1) Three Fundamental Ideas 2) Transition from Paper to Digital 3) Market Forces 4)Strategies
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    Responsible Publishing
    Wittenberg, Kate (Internet-First University Press, 2004-06-01)
    Responsible Publishing: Thinking Creatively and Collaboratively. Breaking Down Traditional Publishing Categories: Books, Journals, Databases, Grey Literature, Teaching Resources Creating New Alliances with Scholars, Libraries, Technology Providers, Scholarly Societies, Publishers. Sharing skills of Librarians, Technologists, and Publishers in Creating Valuable Resources at Reasonable Prices.
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    Developing an Institutionally-funded Publishing Channel: Context & Considerations for Key Issues
    Crow, Raym (Internet-First University Press, 2004-06-01)
    The purpose of this presentation is to explore the viability of direct institutional funding for publishing faculty research, and to define a practical publishing mechanism by which to implement the model.
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    Workshop on Scholarly Publishing: Remarks during Open Session
    Neal, James G. (Internet-First University Press, 2004-06-01)
    A discussion of Scholarly Communication issues and concerns.
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    Workshop on Sustainable Models for University-based Scholarly Publishing
    Cooke, J. Robert (Internet-First University Press, 2004-06-01)
    The purpose of this presentation is to explore financially sustainable and effective approaches to scholarly communications for and by higher education, to identify shared interests, and to facilitate multi-campus collaborations.
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    Creating a Sustainable Scholarly Communication System
    King, Kenneth M. (Internet-First University Press, 2004-05-27)
    The current process of scholarly publication is widely regarded as unsustainable. Ensuring that scholarly information remains accessible to the world's scholars will require the work of a consortium of major research universities. A global consortium of research universities would have the power to negotiate a mutually beneficial relationship with cooperating publishers including permitting the open publication of preprints in disciplinary archives. This consortium could be built around a shared global electronic library constructed from components managed by individual cooperating institutions. These components built on Open Archives Initiative (OAI) compliant servers using open software (e.g. DSpace and EPrints) are currently installed at many universities. The shared library could look like an extension to an individual member's library and contain a full range of materials certified in a variety of ways by contributing institutions. In addition to publishing books, articles, course materials, videos and databases, universities could individually or cooperatively host open and subscription-funded journals in digital form. They could support open, discipline focused preprint archives and encourage faculty to publish in journals that permitted this. This system would help integrate and coordinate multiple efforts to promote open publication and enable open and not-for-profit publishers and university libraries to become partners in the scholarly enterprise, each responsible for a certain phase of the process.
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    Developing an Institutionally-Funded Publishing Channel: Context and Considerations for Key Issues
    Crow, Raym (Internet-First University Press, 2004-07)
    Cornell's Internet First University Press (IFUP) seeks to explore the practical viability of direct institutional funding for serial and monographic publication of an institution?s faculty research. To effect fundamental change, such an institutional funding model must not simply shift the costs from the library to other budgets within the institution. It must disaggregate and restructure the academic publishing value chain to separate the services that facilitate publication from monopolistic control of the material published. To attain this goal in practical terms, the IFUP must demonstrate a sustainable economic model and guarantee author autonomy in the choice of publishing venue. This report reviews past and current academic publishing initiatives that provide context and practical insight into how an institutionally sponsored publishing model might be designed and implemented to satisfy these essential requirements.
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    Open-Access Scholarly Publishing in Economic Perspective
    Getz, Malcolm (Internet-First University Press, 2004-06-11)
    What is the prospect for migrating scholarly journals from paper to digital formats in a way that lowers university expenditures? Although many journals are published digitally, at least so far, the digital format complements paper, increasing university expenditures. Open-access publications that are free to readers and financed by publication fees paid by authors and their agents may both lower costs and allow scholarship to reach a larger audience. However, gains to universities may depend on open-access being qualityassured and controlled by not-for-profit publishers. Potential savings for a typical US research library might be on the order of $2.3 million per year even as the same level of effort goes to reviewing and editing published articles as at present. To launch the initiative, provosts might adopt policies to support publication fees and not-for-profit publishers might invest in start up funds for editing and marketing open-access journals.
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    List of Attendees for the Workshop on 'Sustainable Models for University-based Scholarly Publishing'
    Cooke, J. Robert (Internet-First University Press, 2004-06-01)
    List of Attendees for the Workshop on 'Sustainable Models for University-based Scholarly Publishing'.
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    Workshop on 'Sustainable Models for University-based Scholarly Publishing'
    Cooke, J. Robert (Internet-First University Press, 2004-06-01)
    Agenda for the Workshop on 'Sustainable Models for University-based Scholarly Publishing' from June 01, 2004.