2017 College of Veterinary Medicine News Archive

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    2017 CVM News: Home News Cornell DVM student wins new scholarship for experiential learning
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2017-09-08)
    This news item is about: Gaining experience in the field is a critical part of every veterinary student’s educational experience. Lane Robinson ’18, the opportunity to participate in innovative externships got a little easier this year thanks to a pioneering scholarship program through Morris Animal Foundation. The Morris Animal Foundation and Richard Lichter Charity for Dogs recently announced the first class of students receiving the Veterinary Student Canine Externship Award. The award went to three third-year veterinary students, including Robinson, who were selected for their demonstrated leadership and promise in impacting canine health, welfare and quality of life.
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    2017 CVM News: Ilana Schafer DVM '08 recognized by CDC for contributions to Veterinary Public Health
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2017-09-27)
    This news item is about: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded Dr. Ilana Schafer ‘08 the 2017 James H. Steele Veterinary Public Health Award for her work to control outbreaks of Ebola Virus Disease and other zoonotic diseases. The Steele award recognizes individuals who have completed CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) fellowship and gone on to make significant contributions to veterinary public health. Currently, Schafer is a veterinary epidemiologist in the Bacterial Special Pathogens Branch, but in her various positions at CDC, she has worked on high hazard viruses including Ebola, Marburg, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, and hantavirus, as well as the bacterial infection leptospirosis.
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    2017 CVM News: Dr. Holger Sondermann featured on Cornell Research
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2017-09-26)
    This news item from Cornell Research is about: If you think bacteria are unsophisticated, single-celled organisms passively floating around in their environment, you might want to think again. Over the past few decades, scientists have discovered bacteria are not the knuckleheads we once thought they were (at least in comparison to their eukaryotic counterparts). “It turns out they have a pretty complex lifestyle,” says Holger Sondermann, Molecular Medicine. “They can be either free floating, or they can be part of a larger, coordinated community, called a biofilm. They’re able to switch their lifestyle depending on what is happening in their environment.”
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    2017 CVM News: New app collects pre-vet students’ real-world preparation
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2017-09-27)
    This news item is about: Students planning to apply to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree program have a new way to track their veterinary and animal experiences: the Pre-Vet Tracker Mobile App. The app allows users in internships or who are volunteering or shadowing veterinarians to log dates, hours, supervisors, contact information and list of responsibilities in one place, saving time and making the application process easier.
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    2017 CVM News: World Rabies Day: Rabies prevention is a matter of education, vaccination
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2017-09-27)
    This news item is about: Every nine minutes someone dies from rabies, the deadliest zoonotic disease on the planet. While most cases of rabies are found in Africa, India, and other parts of Asia, each year 30,000 to 60,000 people in the United States receive post-exposure preventive treatment. Four Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine experts explain the impact of rabies worldwide and provide prevention tips:
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    2017 CVM News: Cornell cardiologists offer advanced treatment for horses with atrial fibrillation
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (2017-09-11)
    This news item is about: When medical treatment fails, cardiologists at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine can now offer a procedure that resets the quivering heart of a horse in atrial fibrillation to bring back its normal heartbeat. Drs. Romain Pariaut, associate professor and section chief of cardiology and Bruce Kornreich, associate director of the Feline Health Center and staff cardiologist, recently performed a transvenous electrical cardioversion (TVEC) to treat a horse diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AF), a rapid, irregular heart rhythm that causes decreased blood flow from the heart. This procedure, which involves
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    2017 CVM News: Traveling the world for planetary health: Veterinary students find meaning in global clinical research
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2017-09-15)
    This news item from Global Cornell is about: When Cornell veterinary student Perry Koehler, DVM ’20, was in China's Sichuan province last summer, he noticed something peculiar about the product packaging. ... Koehler is one of 14 students from Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine who traveled to destinations around the world last summer for clinical research that advances planetary health. “Wine, teas, toothpaste, even household cleaners,” he lists off, “all marked with a bear.”
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    2017 CVM News: Dr. Pamela V. Chang featured on Cornell Research
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2017-09-11)
    This news item is about: Each of us has trillions of microbes living in our gut. As we go about our day, many of these microbes regulate processes in our bodies through the production of metabolites, small molecule compounds that are produced by enzymes within their cells. Gut microbes are foreign organisms living inside of us, but they are crucial to our health. Our bodies have to maintain a kind of detente with them, ensuring that we coexist peacefully together in symbiosis. “We’re constantly being challenged by these microbes,” says Pamela V. Chang, Microbiology and Immunology. “When we eat, there is bacteria in our food, and then it gets into the gut. The question is how does the gut react to that?” Understanding the microbiota in the gut is especially important because certain microbes are necessary to maintain protection against infection, according to Chang. A certain balance of microbes is needed for conditions in the gut to be optimal. When an imbalance occurs, the immune system can go haywire, causing chronic inflammation, which in the gut can lead to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like colitis or Crohn’s Disease
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    2017 CVM News: An international accredited veterinary school for Hong Kong
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2017-09-25)
    This news item is about: Until now, Hong Kong has not had a veterinary school, and has been reliant on veterinarians who have qualified overseas for its veterinary services. At any one time, it is estimated that 200 locals are studying veterinary science overseas, with approximately two-thirds in Australia. For the past decade, City University of Hong Kong and Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine have collaborated on a project aimed at establishing a locally based veterinary college with the curriculum modeled on Cornell’s innovative, highly integrated delivery that focuses on problem-based learning.
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    2017 CVM News: Symposium delves into public health issues
    Office of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations (Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2017-09-14)
    This news item is about: Cornell veterinary students know that their DVM degree can lead to a rewarding and exciting career. Last weekend, they learned that it can also help solve world problems. At the eighth annual Veterinary Public Health Symposium, held Sept. 8 and 9, a series of lectures and panel discussions linked veterinary medicine to a range of global issues, from food system security to infectious disease to domestic abuse. The event was organized by the student-run Veterinary Public Health Association and attracted both those affiliated with CVM and local community members.