Indonesia, Vol. 078, October 2004

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    Contributors, Indonesia, volume 78, (October 2004)
    (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
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    Editorial Note, Indonesia, volume 78, (October 2004)
    (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
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    Table of Contents, Indonesia, volume 78, (October 2004)
    (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
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    The World of Sergeant-Major Bungkus: Two Interviews with Benedict Anderson and Arief Djati
    Anderson, Benedict R. O'G.; Djati, Arief (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
    In 2002, Benedict Anderson and Arief Djati twice interviewed Sergeant-Major Bungkus, a career soldier in the Indonesian military, who on October 1, 1965 led one of the squads sent to arrest or kill the seven generals who had allegedly plotted a coup against President Sukarno. Having survived thirty-four years on death row after he was convicted for his participation in the G30S operation, Pak Bungkus is one of the few living witnesses to those events. The interviews have been translated, synthesized, and annotated by Anderson and Arief Djati.
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    Review Essay: Viewing Areas
    Rutherford, Danilyn (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
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    Islam and the Habits of Democracy: Islamic Organizations in Post-New Order South Sumatra
    Collins, Elizabeth Fuller (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
    Islamic organizations in South Sumatra vary dramatically in their expressed commitment to or rejection of democratic values and in the way they are politically structured, ranging from Muhammadiyah, which supports and applies democratic values, to the Islamic Defenders Front (Front Pembela Islam) and the Islamist Council of Indonesian Mujahidin (Majelis Mujahidin Indonesia), which explicitly reject democracy and have an authoritarian structure. This study suggests that in the more open political environment of the post-Suharto period, the authoritarian Islamic organizations are losing their appeal, and organizations that appeal to Islamic values—such as the unity of the Islamic community and the authority of religious leaders—have begun to change in ways that make their practices more democratic.
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    Indonesia's Accountability Trap: Party Cartels and Presidential Power after Democratic Transition
    Slater, Dan (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
    The fall of Indonesia’s New Order regime set the stage for more competitive elections, but not necessarily for more competitive elites. Party and military leaders have primarily responded to democratic transition by sharing power rather than competing for it, especially by ensuring that all major political groupings enjoy lucrative and powerful positions in the cabinet. The recent introduction of direct presidential elections has inadvertently threatened to unsettle this cozy and collusive elite arrangement—but only at the risk of restoring dangerous patterns of presidential domination.
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    From Economic Actor to Moral Agent: Knowledge, Fate and Hierarchy among the Bugis of Sulawesi
    Acciaioli, Greg (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
    Analysts of the Bugis, from Alfred Russel Wallace to Andrew Vayda, especially when concentrating on those Bugis living in the periphery outside their homeland of South Sulawesi, have often invoked predominantly economic motivations in explaining their migration decisions, livelihood choices, and other aspects of their interaction with the environment. This paper emphasizes instead the importance of their beliefs and values related to mobility, foregrounding the quest for various types of knowledge, often esoteric, that underlies various behavioral patterns. This quest is contextualized in terms of basic tenets of cosmology and aspects of ethnopersonality that contribute to Bugis evaluations of ways of acting, including a commoner ideology that contrasts with noble notions of hierarchy that are often presented (e.g. by Shelly Errington) as the basis of Bugis sociocultural structure.
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    The World of Sergeant-Major Bungkus: Introduction
    Anderson, Benedict R. O'G. (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
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    The Indonesian Free Book Press
    García, Michael Nieto (Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 2004-10)
    Post-New Order reforms have left the book publishing industry in Indonesia with greater freedom of the press than that of the journalistic press. Alternative presses have blossomed, but important books remain priced out of range for most Indonesians, complicating the issue of intellectual property rights, which have yet to be effectively enforced in Indonesia.