Branching Out is an Integrated Pest Management newsletter for Trees and Shrubs produced by faculty and staff in Cornell's Plant Pathology & Plant-Microbe Biology section, in cooperation with Cornell Cooperative Extension educators.

Branching Out feature articles contain information on a wide array of the most important pest management issues that plant health care professionals are likely to face in any given year. Each feature, complete with topnotch color illustrations, describes in some detail either an individual pest/pathogen, a group of closely related (by symptoms or hosts) pests/pathogens, plant problems caused by non-infectious agents, or some other important issues.

Materials provided here represent excerpts from complete issues. More information about this publication is available on the Branching Out website.

Recent Submissions

  • Consumer ‘Extended Weed Control’ Products: Nothing is Foolproof! 

    Senesac, Andy (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2016-07-15)
    The study evaluated four ready-to-use products available to homeowners that offer postemergence weed control and additional ‘extended control’. In the study these extended control products were applied to the base of four ...
  • Wasted Woodchips? What To Do? 

    Hudler, George (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2015-06-12)
    One big question that overshadows any efforts to use chips as mulch is whether or not those chips?-?if from a diseased tree?-?pose any threat to the health of the trees that are otherwise expected to benefit from the ...
  • What is Making My Spruce Tree Drop its Needles? 

    Dailey O'Brien, Dawn (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2013-08-09)
    Spruce trees are susceptible to a variety of needle diseases that cause their needles to shed which can severely affect their aesthetic value and the health of the tree. Spruces can become more susceptible to diseases and ...
  • Viburnum Pests 

    Dailey O'Brien, Dawn (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2016-04-29)
    Common insect pests of viburnums include the black bean aphid (Aphis fabae) and the snowball aphid (Neoceruraphis viburnicola), Viburnum Leaf Beetle (Pyrrhalta viburni), the viburnum clearwing borer (Synanthedon viburni) ...
  • Rhododendron Problems: More Than Just Phytophthora 

    Mills, Jody (Cornell University Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 2017-07-21)
    Although Phytophthora can be devastating to rhododendrons there are a variety of other problems that are actually more common.Cultural and site-related problems include interveinal chlorosis and desiccation injury. Disease ...

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