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dc.contributor.authorKunigami, Andre Keiji
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-23T13:33:41Z
dc.date.available2018-10-23T13:33:41Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-30
dc.identifier.otherKunigami_cornellgrad_0058F_11026
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornellgrad:11026
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 10489675
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59579
dc.description.abstractOf Clouds and Bodies: Film and the Dislocation of Vision in Brazilian and Japanese Interwar Avant-gardes examines the political impact of film in conceptualizations of the body, vision, and movement in the 1920s and 1930s avant-gardes of Brazil and Japan. Through photographs, films, and different textual genres—travel diary, screenplay, theoretical essay, movie criticism, novel—I investigate the similar political role played by film in these "non-Western" avant-gardes in their relation to the idea of modernity, usually equivalent to that of the "West." I explore racial, political, and historical entanglements that emerge when debates on aesthetic form encounters the filmic medium, theorized and experienced by the so-called "non-Western" spectator. Through avant-garde films such as Mário Peixoto’s Limite (1930), and Kinugasa Teinosuke’s A Page of Madness (1926); the theorizations of Octávio de Faria and Tanizaki Jun’ichirō; and the photographs and writings by Mário de Andrade and Murayama Tomoyoshi, this dissertation follows the clash between the desire for a universal and disembodied vision, and the encounter with filmic perception. I argue that the filmic apparatus, as a technology and a commodity, emphasizes an embodied and localized experience of vision and time that revealed the discourse on cultural-historical difference—the distinction between West and Rest, or modern and non-modern—as a suppressive modulator of material power dynamics embedded in racial, class, and gender hierarchies enjoyed by the cosmopolitan elite in the "peripheral" spaces. The temporality of filmic perception becomes a problem for the avant-garde program of "moving forward." The dissertation is punctuated with images that traveled across national territories, building a political theory of the technical image that takes into consideration the experience of a displaced spectatorship: transnational, in racially marked bodies, and within discourses of historical belatedness. Comparing two disparate spaces through a mobile medium that represents movement, I explore the possibilities and limits of nation-bound comparison and area studies, while contributing to debates in film and media theory.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectFilm studies
dc.subjectLatin American studies
dc.subjectAsian studies
dc.subjectBrazilian cinema
dc.subjectcritical race studies
dc.subjectfilm and media theory
dc.subjectfilm-phenomenology
dc.subjectJapanese cinema
dc.subjectperipheral avantgardes
dc.titleOF CLOUDS AND BODIES: FILM AND THE DISLOCATION OF VISION IN BRAZILIAN AND JAPANESE INTERWAR AVANT-GARDES
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineAsian Literature, Religion, and Culture
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Asian Literature, Religion, and Culture
dc.contributor.chairSakai, Naoki
dc.contributor.committeeMemberVillarejo, Amy
dc.contributor.committeeMemberde Bary, Brett
dc.contributor.committeeMemberErber, Pedro Rabelo
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/X47P8WM6


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