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dc.contributor.authorKonvitz, Milton R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-30T18:45:21Z
dc.date.available2020-11-30T18:45:21Z
dc.date.issued1973
dc.identifier.other7668986
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/82695
dc.descriptionDuration: 30:57
dc.description.abstractFor Locke, Professor Konvitz suggests, political sovereignty is dependent upon the existence of a social contract between the sovereign, the legislature, and the people who, through this contract, agree to be governed. It is the right of the governed, acting as a whole, to revolt against their government when it no longer protects their natural rights and to seek a new government that will act in accordance with these rights. It is further the right of individuals within such a society to refuse to act in accordance with specific laws that offend their personal conscience, but they should be prepared to suffer consequences for violating such laws. In the latter concept, Locke, Professor Konvitz asserts, has anticipated the essential elements of the concept of civil disobedience.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectlaw
dc.subjectConstitution
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectBill of Rights
dc.subjectAmerican ideals
dc.titleAmerican Ideals 37. Sovereignty
dc.typesound
dc.description.audio1_qylkvxkj
dc.description.legacydownloads4289avb02f02_14.mp3: 40 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationKonvitz, Milton R.: Cornell University


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