Now showing items 1-20 of 44

    • American Ideals 40. Emerson's History 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz explores Emerson’s critique of history, its impact on human lives in the present, and its relation as a continuum in the evolution of man’s understanding of universal moral principles. Man makes his own ...
    • American Ideals 43. William James and God 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz asserts that insofar as they believe there are limits to intelligence, to logic, and to the scientific method, Emerson and James agree. James, on the other hand, rejects the concept of an absolute deity, ...
    • American Ideals 29. Utopia 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      More postulates a mythical society based on the laws of nature (wisdom, temperance, justice, and virtue) and a theology that includes a belief in Divine Providence, the existence of an immortal soul in humans, and reward ...
    • American Ideals 37. Sovereignty 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      For Locke, Professor Konvitz suggests, political sovereignty is dependent upon the existence of a social contract between the sovereign, the legislature, and the people who, through this contract, agree to be governed. It ...
    • American Ideals 19. Socrates, Part 4 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Responding to a student question, Professor Konvitz uses the incident of the Camden (New Jersey) 28 assault on draft records to distinguish between revolution and civil disobedience. He then goes on to discuss Socrates’ ...
    • American Ideals 39. Emerson's Nature 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz’s introduction to Emerson has not been recorded here, and this lecture appears incomplete. For Emerson, Professor Konvitz asserts, man’s mind is prior to the natural world and that world is as man perceives ...
    • American Ideals 23. Cosmopolitanism 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Alexander, in opposition to the Greek parochialism of his time, introduced the concept of world citizenship to his empire. Professor Konvitz explains that the concept that all humankind was to be deemed fellow citizens was ...
    • American Ideals 20. Greek Playwrights 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz suggests that the plays of Sophocles and Aeschylus enhance humanity’s understanding of guilt, innocence, and Divine punishment. Oedipus Rex and Antigone, in particular, are analyzed in detail.
    • American Ideals 18. Socrates, Part 3 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Socrates believed that essences were discoverable by inductive reasoning. The Socratic Method emphasized understanding the essence of things and abstract concepts such as truth and beauty. His theory of inductive reasoning ...
    • American Ideals 01. Course Introduction 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz explains the connection of ILR 308 to the present semester’s study. In 308, he explored the evolution of those American ideals inherent in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights and subsequently utilized ...
    • American Ideals 03. The Hebrew Bible, Part 2 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz distinguishes between Homeric and Hebrew literary styles. In the Illiad and Odyssey, everything that Homer wants to say is put in the foreground and externalized. The events and relationships between the ...
    • American Ideals 17. Socrates, Part 2 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The business of the soul is to try to grapple with the central moral truths and how mankind must live the good life. Socratic concepts would ultimately also influence Jewish and Christian thinking about the immortality of ...
    • American Ideals 02. The Hebrew Bible, Part 1 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Human dignity, justice, equality, love, and the rule of law are not alluded to specifically in the documents upon which our nation was founded, but they are implied, Dr. Konvitz explains, and it is the origins of these ...
    • American Ideals 15. Human Rights 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      God’s love is demonstrated in commandments such as the keeping of the Sabbath and the concepts of charity elucidated in the Bible. Such commandments, Professor Konvitz explains, help define our duties to our fellow beings, ...
    • American Ideals 14. Love Thy Neighbor 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz quotes the Hebrew and Christian Bibles as well as modern authorities to expound the concept that the self can only be fully developed in context of the rest of humanity rather than by selfish self-interest. ...
    • American Ideals 16. Socrates, Part 1 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Socrates, building on earlier Greek philosophic insights, made the analysis of concept of the soul central to his teaching. For Socrates, the immortal soul was the moral and intellectual center of humanity. It is the soul ...
    • American Ideals 10. Immortality 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The evolution of the concepts of resurrection and immortality in Judaic-Christian thought are explored by Dr. Konvitz. There are hints in the Book of Daniel of these concepts, which begin to affect Pharisaical Jewish ...
    • American Ideals 32. Pleasure in Utopia 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      More rejects Stoic and Christian asceticism, Dr. Konvitz tells us, in favor of pleasure and pleasant experiences as a proper expression of natural reason so long as the exercise of personal pleasure does not hurt others ...
    • American Ideals 33. John Locke 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz states that John Locke was one of the most influential political philosophers of the last two centuries. Locke’s writings were the intellectual basis for many of the ideas embodied in the American Declaration ...
    • American Ideals 26. The Stoics, Part 3 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The Stoics recognized that man is social by nature and extended the horizon of human obligations to all of humankind, where the earlier Greek philosophers as well as the Hebrews saw these obligations limited to their own ...