Now showing items 1-20 of 46

    • American Ideals 02. The Hebrew Bible, Part 1 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Human dignity, justice, equality, love, and the rule of law are not alluded to specifically in the documents upon which our nation was founded, but they are implied, Dr. Konvitz explains, and it is the origins of these ...
    • American Ideals 36. Religion 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Locke’s views on religious toleration are a “tremendously important contribution” on this subject, which anticipated the First Amendment to the Constitution and subsequent Supreme Court decisions. Professor Konvitz argues ...
    • American Ideals 32. Pleasure in Utopia 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      More rejects Stoic and Christian asceticism, Dr. Konvitz tells us, in favor of pleasure and pleasant experiences as a proper expression of natural reason so long as the exercise of personal pleasure does not hurt others ...
    • American Ideals 40. Emerson's History 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz explores Emerson’s critique of history, its impact on human lives in the present, and its relation as a continuum in the evolution of man’s understanding of universal moral principles. Man makes his own ...
    • American Ideals 33. John Locke 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz states that John Locke was one of the most influential political philosophers of the last two centuries. Locke’s writings were the intellectual basis for many of the ideas embodied in the American Declaration ...
    • American Ideals 31. Religion in Utopia 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Utopians’ religious beliefs are again touched upon by Professor Konvitz. Those who did not share these views could not hold public office and could not discuss their alternative views in public but were encouraged to do ...
    • American Ideals 37. Sovereignty 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      For Locke, Professor Konvitz suggests, political sovereignty is dependent upon the existence of a social contract between the sovereign, the legislature, and the people who, through this contract, agree to be governed. It ...
    • American Ideals 42. William James 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      As a philosopher, Professor Konvitz explains, James rejected that the scientific method was the only method by which to arrive at the truth. Advocates of religion, James argued, have a right to assert the moral and spiritual ...
    • American Ideals 39. Emerson's Nature 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz’s introduction to Emerson has not been recorded here, and this lecture appears incomplete. For Emerson, Professor Konvitz asserts, man’s mind is prior to the natural world and that world is as man perceives ...
    • American Ideals 30. Reform in Utopia 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz suggests that More is almost modern in his approach to the social problems he identifies. Utopians advocated common education and common work experiences for every man as a way of achieving recognition ...
    • American Ideals 18. Socrates, Part 3 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Socrates believed that essences were discoverable by inductive reasoning. The Socratic Method emphasized understanding the essence of things and abstract concepts such as truth and beauty. His theory of inductive reasoning ...
    • American Ideals 29. Utopia 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      More postulates a mythical society based on the laws of nature (wisdom, temperance, justice, and virtue) and a theology that includes a belief in Divine Providence, the existence of an immortal soul in humans, and reward ...
    • American Ideals 17. Socrates, Part 2 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The business of the soul is to try to grapple with the central moral truths and how mankind must live the good life. Socratic concepts would ultimately also influence Jewish and Christian thinking about the immortality of ...
    • American Ideals 13. Man in society 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The Judaic-Christian concepts of human responsibility to self and especially to society and their biblical roots are discussed at length. Professor Konvitz elucidates the similarities of Jewish and Catholic viewpoints on ...
    • American Ideals 14. Love Thy Neighbor 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz quotes the Hebrew and Christian Bibles as well as modern authorities to expound the concept that the self can only be fully developed in context of the rest of humanity rather than by selfish self-interest. ...
    • American Ideals 22. Alexander the Great 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz sets Alexander in his historical context as the greatest conqueror in human history. Alexander spread Greek culture and learning throughout his empire by establishing garrisons and cities that stretched ...
    • American Ideals 23. Cosmopolitanism 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Alexander, in opposition to the Greek parochialism of his time, introduced the concept of world citizenship to his empire. Professor Konvitz explains that the concept that all humankind was to be deemed fellow citizens was ...
    • American Ideals 20. Greek Playwrights 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz suggests that the plays of Sophocles and Aeschylus enhance humanity’s understanding of guilt, innocence, and Divine punishment. Oedipus Rex and Antigone, in particular, are analyzed in detail.
    • American Ideals 21. Antigone 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      In its discussion of civil law versus higher law, Sophocles’ play expounds on the basic principles that define humanity and reflect human’s godly qualities.
    • American Ideals 09. Viewing Time, Part 2 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The Christian acceptance of linear time and history was challenged by contemporary Greek philosophers who held to the cyclical view. The problem that this view of history held for the Church was simply that if time and ...