A Voice is Worth a Thousand Words: The Implications of the Micro-Coding of Social Signals in Speech for Trust Research

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While self-report measures are often highly reliable for field research on trust (Mayer and Davis, 1999), subjects often cannot complete surveys during real time interactions. In contrast, the social signals that are embedded in the non-linguistic elements of conversations can be captured in real time and extracted with the assistance of computer coding. This chapter seeks to understand how computer-coded social signals are related to interpersonal trust.
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2012-01-01
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micro-coding; trust; conversation
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Required Publisher Statement: © Edward Elgar Publishing. Final version published as: Waber, B., Williams, M., Carroll, J., & Pentland, A. (2012). A voice is worth a thousand words: The implications of the micro-coding of social signals in speech for trust research. In F. Lyon, G. Möllering, M. Saunders & T. Hatzakis (Eds.), Handbook of Research Methods on Trust(pp. 249-258). Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.
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