eCommons

 

Light, fluidics and their applications in global sustainability and health

Other Titles

Abstract

The microscopic precision in simultaneous delivery of light and fluids by optofluidics offers great potential for global sustainability and health applications. Light drives photocatalytic reactions in a gas/liquid environment containing catalyst nanoparticles and reactants in global sustainability applications. The relevant efforts in this dissertation include: (1) a “shell-and-tube” glass waveguide-based photoreactor technology for converting CO2 to fuels, (2) a “gradient etching” approach to enable uniform light scattering of waveguides for enhanced photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dyes, and (3) the optimization of both design and operating parameters of waveguide-based photoreactors via Multiphysics simulations. In global health applications, the fluidic environment involves various bodily fluids, such as serum, plasma, or human whole blood samples. Light irradiation by the optical reader excites the signals on test and control lines, and these line intensities are collected for later quantification of analyte concentrations. The health-related efforts in this dissertation include: (1) an iPad-based multiplexed lateral flow assay (LFA) system to differentially detect human malaria species with a single test line, (2) an optical reader-based multiplexed LFA system for differential diagnosis of malaria and typhoid infections, and (3) a fluorescence reader-based multiplexed LFA system for differentiating bacterial and viral infections.

Journal / Series

Volume & Issue

Description

204 pages

Supplemental file(s) description: The assembly view of HI-Light reactor.

Sponsorship

Date Issued

2021-12

Publisher

Keywords

Climate change; CO2 reduction; Global health; Global sustainability; Optofluidics; Point-of-care diagnostics

Location

Effective Date

Expiration Date

Sector

Employer

Union

Union Local

NAICS

Number of Workers

Committee Chair

Erickson, David

Committee Co-Chair

Committee Member

Mehta, Saurabh
Hanrath, Tobias
Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

Degree Discipline

Mechanical Engineering

Degree Name

Ph. D., Mechanical Engineering

Degree Level

Doctor of Philosophy

Related Version

Related DOI

Related To

Related Part

Based on Related Item

Has Other Format(s)

Part of Related Item

Related To

Related Publication(s)

Link(s) to Related Publication(s)

References

Link(s) to Reference(s)

Previously Published As

Government Document

ISBN

ISMN

ISSN

Other Identifiers

Rights

Rights URI

Types

dissertation or thesis

Accessibility Feature

Accessibility Hazard

Accessibility Summary

Link(s) to Catalog Record