HOW HOSPITALITY FIRM STRATEGIES AFFECT CONSUMER BIASES IN ONLINE REVIEWS

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Abstract
Online reviews have become increasingly important to both consumers and businesses and, as a result, have attracted considerable research attention. However, all reviews are not created equal, as consumers may differ in their propensities to leave reviews, often as a function of their satisfaction. To ensure a more representative customer voice, companies often utilize different strategies to moderate the biases in online reviews. The strategies deployed by many hospitality firms differ dramatically in both how reviews are collected and where they are posted. This study investigates five review collection strategies of major hospitality companies and analyzes how each strategy affects review metrics (e.g., rating, length, and sentiment). We find that the effort required to post a review impacts review characteristics. We show that reviews collected through self-motivation methods tend to be lower-rated and longer, whereas reviews solicited from companies through post-stay emails tend to exhibit different characteristics. To measure the impact of the collection methods on review sentiment, we explore five different sentiment analysis methods and find results that are inconsistent both across the analysis methods and with other review metrics.
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Description
77 pages
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Date Issued
2021-08
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Keywords
hotel strategy; motivation; natural language processing; review posting behavior; reviews; word of mouth
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Union Local
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Committee Chair
Anderson, Christopher K.
Committee Co-Chair
Committee Member
Chun, Helen
Degree Discipline
Hotel Administration
Degree Name
M.S., Hotel Administration
Degree Level
Master of Science
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Government Document
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dissertation or thesis
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