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Are Christian/Religious People Poor Tippers?

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Abstract

A web-based survey was used to assess the relationships of religious faith and frequency of church attendance with tipping under conditions of good and bad service. Results indicated that Jews and those with no religion tipped more than Christians and members of other religions, but that the vast majority of Christians tipped at or above the normative 15% of bill size. Worship frequency also significantly interacted with service quality such that the tips of those who frequently worship vary with service quality less than the tips of those who worship less frequently. The practical implications of these results for service workers and restaurants or other service businesses with a large religious clientele are discussed.

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2013-01-01

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foodservice operations; food and beverage; restaurant tipping; consumer behavior; religion

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Required Publisher Statement: © Wiley. Final version published as: Lynn, M., & Katz, B. (2013). Are Christian/religious people poor tippers? Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 43(5), 928-935. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

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