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Individual-Level Determinants of the Propensity to Shirk

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Abstract

Employee shirking, where workers give less than full effort on the job, has typically been investigated as a construct subject to group and organization-level influences. Neglected are individual differences that might explain why individuals in the same organization or work-group might shirk. The present study sought to address these limitations by investigating subjective well-being (a dispositional construct), job satisfaction, as well as other individual-level determinants of shirking behavior. Results identified several individual-level determinants of shirking. Implications of the results are discussed.

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Sponsorship

Date Issued

1990-12-01

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Keywords

CAHRS; ILR; center; human resource; job; worker; advanced; labor market; satisfaction; employee; work; manage; management; health care; flexible benefit; HRM; employ; model; industrial relations; labor market; job satisfaction; job performance; productivity; measurement; compensation; pay; voluntary turnover; salary; pay level; benefit; pay raise; job growth; managerial; employment growth; college degree

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preprint

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