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When Stock Options Fail to Motivate: Attribution and Context Effects on Stock Price Expectancy

dc.contributor.authorDunford, Benjamin B.
dc.contributor.authorBoudreau, John W.
dc.contributor.authorBoswell, Wendy R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:54:57Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:54:57Z
dc.date.issued2002-01-01
dc.description.abstractThis study draws on attribution theory and literature from compensation and strategy to investigate executives’ perceptions about their influence over the firm’s stock price. We define stock price expectancy as the extent to which executives feel that they can influence the firm’s stock price. Results from of a survey of 435 U.S. executives suggest that stock price expectancy is related to both attributional and contextual antecedents. Based on these findings we discuss implications for the extension of expectancy theory and the design and administration of incentive systems.
dc.description.legacydownloadsWP02_04.pdf: 1617 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
dc.identifier.other112476
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77331
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectfirms
dc.subjectcompensation
dc.subjectperformance
dc.subjectstock
dc.subjecttenure
dc.subjectstock options
dc.subjectmotivation
dc.subjectexpectancy theory
dc.titleWhen Stock Options Fail to Motivate: Attribution and Context Effects on Stock Price Expectancy
dc.typepreprint
local.authorAffiliationDunford, Benjamin B.: Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationBoudreau, John W.: Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationBoswell, Wendy R.: Texas A&M University

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