eCommons

DigitalCollections@ILR
ILR School
 

Unpaid Care Work and Its Impact on New Yorkers’ Paid Employment

Other Titles

Abstract

The widening gulf between the vast need for care in our society and the limited accessibility of care has led us into a “crisis of care.” While the need for care is universal, care work has been relegated to the status of a private concern since the rise of capitalist industrialization. As the increasingly sharp divisions between the public realm of the market and the private realm of the home led to more fixed and gendered divisions between productive labor (“men’s work”) and reproductive labor (“women’s work”), the labor of caring—for children, for elders, for those with illness or disability—was devalued, whether unpaid or paid. This pattern has been reinforced by neoliberal restructuring of the economy and public services, even amid shifts in labor market participation and changes in gendered norms of care work in the family. To explore current patterns of unpaid caregiving and its impact on New Yorkers’ paid employment, this policy brief shares relevant findings from the 2022 Empire State Poll, carried out by the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR).

Journal / Series

Volume & Issue

Description

Sponsorship

Date Issued

2023-06

Publisher

Cornell University, ILR School, The Workers Institute

Keywords

New York State; care work; labor market; unpaid caregiving; unpaid employment

Location

Effective Date

Expiration Date

Sector

Employer

Union

Union Local

NAICS

Number of Workers

Committee Chair

Committee Co-Chair

Committee Member

Degree Discipline

Degree Name

Degree Level

Related Version

Related DOI

Related To

Related Part

Based on Related Item

Has Other Format(s)

Part of Related Item

Related To

Related Publication(s)

Link(s) to Related Publication(s)

References

Link(s) to Reference(s)

Previously Published As

Government Document

ISBN

ISMN

ISSN

Other Identifiers

Rights

Rights URI

Types

report

Accessibility Feature

alternative text; bookmarks; high contract display; reading order; structural navigation; tagged PDF

Accessibility Hazard

none

Accessibility Summary

Accessible pdf

Link(s) to Catalog Record