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Affective Forecasting and Self-Control: Why Anticipating Pride Wins Over Anticipating Shame in a Self-Regulation Context

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We demonstrate that anticipating pride from resisting temptation facilitates self-control due to an enhanced focus on the self while anticipating shame from giving in to temptation results in self-control failure due to a focus on the tempting stimulus. In two studies we demonstrate the effects of anticipating pride (vs. shame) on self-control thoughts and behavior over time (Studies 1 and 2) and illustrate the process mechanism of self vs. stimulus focus underlying the differential influence of these emotions on self-control (Study 2). We present thought protocols, behavioral data (quantity consumed) and observational data (number/size of bites) to support our hypotheses.

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2009-01-01

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consumer behavior; temptation; pride anticipation; shame anticipation; self-control; self-regulation

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Required Publisher Statement: © Elsevier. Final version published as: Patrick, V. M., Chun, H. H., & Macinnis, D. J. (2009). Affective forecasting and self-control: Why anticipating pride wins over anticipating shame in a self-regulation context. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 19(3), 537-545. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

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