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Physical Mechanisms Of Bacterial Attachment And Internalization In Plants: Multiscale Modeling With Non-Invasive Imaging

dc.contributor.authorWarning, Alexander
dc.contributor.chairDatta,Ashim K
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKirby,Brian
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWu,Mingming
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-04T18:04:49Z
dc.date.available2021-02-01T07:00:52Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-01
dc.description.abstractHuman pathogens interact with fresh produce through the initial attachment, internalization, growth/death, spreading, and dispersion. In order to develop better mitigation strategies for improving fresh produce safety, physics-based models were developed to provide a mechanistic understanding of experimental results in literature that extrapolate between food systems, improving food safety predictions and process safety. Non-invasive imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray microcomputed tomography (X-ray [MICRO SIGN]CT), was used to determine model properties, acquire geometries, and validate results. Three models were then developed: a porous media transport model to study internalization of pathogens during hydrocooling, a two-way coupled continuum-individual based model to study growth, death, and dispersion on leafy greens, and a Lagrangian particle tracking model for bacteria to study how plant surface microstructures affect their attachment. The models are connected through the numerical procedures, i.e. multiscale modeling, and theoretical framework in each. Each model works across time and length scales to develop the computational, multiscale modeling foundation for elucidating the physical mechanisms of fresh produce contamination by bacteria to better develop mitigation strategies.
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 9596954
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/43554
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectfood safety
dc.subjectattachment
dc.subjectbacterial growth
dc.titlePhysical Mechanisms Of Bacterial Attachment And Internalization In Plants: Multiscale Modeling With Non-Invasive Imaging
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Biological Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Agricultural and Biological Engineering

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