Retaliation: The Fastest-Growing Discrimination Claim

dc.contributor.authorSherwyn, David
dc.contributor.authorEigen, Zev
dc.contributor.authorGilman, Gregg
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-12T21:05:02Z
dc.date.available2020-09-12T21:05:02Z
dc.date.issued2006-11-01
dc.description.abstractMany employers were shocked and alarmed when the U.S. Supreme Court in June 2006 unanimously established a relatively broad standard regarding employees’ complaints of retaliation by employers when employees have made discrimination complaints. An examination of case law as well as comments made by those attending the 2006 Labor and Employment Law Roundtable at the Cornell University School of Hotel Administration allow us to conclude that although employees who make complaints need to be treated carefully, employers need not panic. Instead, they must thoroughly document any personnel actions and base them on actual performance, making sure that any termination or demotion is, in fact, not a retaliation.
dc.description.legacydownloadsSherwyn13_Retaliation.pdf: 451 downloads, before Aug. 1, 2020.
dc.identifier.other5755299
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/71797
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: © Cornell University. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectretaliation
dc.subjectprotected expression
dc.subjectdiscrimination
dc.subjectemployment
dc.subjectroundtable
dc.titleRetaliation: The Fastest-Growing Discrimination Claim
dc.typearticle
local.authorAffiliationSherwyn, David: dss18@cornell.edu Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationEigen, Zev: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
local.authorAffiliationGilman, Gregg: Cornell University
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