eCommons

 

LAND OF GOLD AND OPPORTUNITY: BANANAS, GENDER, AND RURAL SOCIAL LIFE ON THE SOUTHERN ECUADORIAN COAST

Access Restricted

Access to this document is restricted. Some items have been embargoed at the request of the author, but will be made publicly available after the "No Access Until" date.

During the embargo period, you may request access to the item by clicking the link to the restricted file(s) and completing the request form. If we have contact information for a Cornell author, we will contact the author and request permission to provide access. If we do not have contact information for a Cornell author, or the author denies or does not respond to our inquiry, we will not be able to provide access. For more information, review our policies for restricted content.

No Access Until

2024-09-06
Permanent Link(s)

Other Titles

Author(s)

Abstract

This is a study of how land rights, banana contracts, and gendered ideologies and practices coalesce to shape rural livelihoods on Ecuador’s southern coast. In 2012, over three hundred workers organized into five agricultural associations to apply for Plan Tierras and the redistribution of the military’s banana and guadua bamboo plantations. In 2015, four of the associations successfully gained their provisional land title to continue with banana exports whereas the transfer of the guadua plantations remains at an impasse. I use a (feminist) political ecology framework and (political) ethnography to analyze land redistribution, contracts, and gendered disparities in Ecuador’s banana industry – the world’s leading banana exporter. My analysis is based on fourteen months of ethnography in 2018-2019, over 80 semi-structured interviews with members and workers of the five associations, and a photovoice project held with women banana workers. I make three inter-related arguments. First, the ability for associations to pay the state for the land is predicated on the banana contract. Without a contract, the associations are vulnerable and economically insecure. Unstable contracts or unreliable banana contracts contribute to flexible work contracts and labor precarity. Second, the gender quotas required for the association’s membership increased women’s access to land rights and enhanced women’s leadership and decision-making power within the associations. However, women’s ability to benefit from land is based on the gendered division of labor that places women in the packing plant and men in the field. Third, I argue bureaucratic processes hinder the effective redistribution of land. Waiting for the state and land rights turns into a grievance that encourages local organizations to join national-movement organizations and seek alternative channels to the state. Waiting is a temporal and spatial processes and a site of struggle for the recognition of land rights and a political opportunity for movement-building.

Journal / Series

Volume & Issue

Description

127 pages

Sponsorship

Date Issued

2022-08

Publisher

Keywords

Bananas; Contract Farming; Labor Precarity; Land Rights; Social Movements

Location

Effective Date

Expiration Date

Sector

Employer

Union

Union Local

NAICS

Number of Workers

Committee Chair

Wolford, Wendy W.

Committee Co-Chair

Committee Member

McMichael, Philip
Roberts, Kenneth

Degree Discipline

Development Sociology

Degree Name

Ph. D., Development Sociology

Degree Level

Doctor of Philosophy

Related Version

Related DOI

Related To

Related Part

Based on Related Item

Has Other Format(s)

Part of Related Item

Related To

Related Publication(s)

Link(s) to Related Publication(s)

References

Link(s) to Reference(s)

Previously Published As

Government Document

ISBN

ISMN

ISSN

Other Identifiers

Rights

Rights URI

Types

dissertation or thesis

Accessibility Feature

Accessibility Hazard

Accessibility Summary

Link(s) to Catalog Record