Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStrogatz, Steven H.
dc.date.accessioned2004-04-14T14:50:25Z
dc.date.available2004-04-14T14:50:25Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1813/97
dc.description.abstractThis video shows six laboratory demonstrations of chaos and nonlinear phenomena, intended for use in a first course on nonlinear dynamics. Steven Strogatz explains the principles being illustrated and why they are important. The demonstrations are: (1) A tabletop waterwheel that is an exact mechanical analog of the Lorenz equations, one of the most famous chaotic systems; (2) A double pendulum, a paradigm of chaos in conservative systems; (3) Airplane wing vibrations and aeroelastic instabilities, as exemplars of Hopf bifurcations; (4) Self-sustained oscillations in a chemical reaction; (5) Using synchronized chaos to send secret messages; and (6) Composing musical variations with a chaotic mapping. Strogatz is joined by his colleagues Howard Stone, John Dugundji, Irving Epstein, Kevin Cuomo, and Diana Dabby.en
dc.format.extent223097 bytes
dc.format.extent156430028 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypevideo/quicktime
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherInternet-First University Pressen
dc.subjectSteven Strogatzen
dc.subjectHoward Stoneen
dc.subjectJohn Dugundjien
dc.subjectIrving Epsteinen
dc.subjectKevin Cuomoen
dc.subjectDiana Dabbyen
dc.subjectnonlinearen
dc.subjectdynamicsen
dc.subjectchaosen
dc.subjectoscillatoren
dc.titleNonlinear dynamics and chaos: Lab demonstrationsen
dc.typevideo/moving imageen
dc.description.viewer1_i3adhmwren_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics