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dc.contributor.authorAsian Development Bank
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-02T22:20:31Z
dc.date.available2020-12-02T22:20:31Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-01
dc.identifier.other10217535
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/87328
dc.description.abstractKey Messages Growth of the ready-made garment industry has provided the first mass formal employment for women in Bangladesh, and growth in the sector is expected to continue providing opportunities. With economic diversification, growth in manufacturing industries, such as the leather sector (footwear) and other potential industries, including pharmaceutical or information technology, should provide additional employment for women. Changes to attitudes and power relations are not something that can be achieved overnight. One of the great lessons of the economics of discrimination is that with the right economic incentives, the motivation for profit may accelerate changes of traditions.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: © Asian Development Back. Available at ADB’s Open Access Repository under a Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY 3.0 IGO).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/
dc.subjectgarment industry
dc.subjectBangladesh
dc.subjectwomen
dc.subjectemployment
dc.titleWomen at Work
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsADB_Women_at_work.pdf: 43 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationAsian Development Bank: True


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Required Publisher Statement: © Asian Development Back. Available at ADB’s Open Access Repository under a Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY 3.0 IGO).

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