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dc.contributor.authorKonvitz, Milton R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-30T18:46:31Z
dc.date.available2020-11-30T18:46:31Z
dc.date.issued1973
dc.identifier.other7662721
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/82729
dc.descriptionDuration: 48:30
dc.description.abstractProfessor Konvitz distinguishes between Homeric and Hebrew literary styles. In the Illiad and Odyssey, everything that Homer wants to say is put in the foreground and externalized. The events and relationships between the mortal characters and the gods are clearly explicated. In the Bible, on the other hand, only so much of the setting and relationships as is necessary is revealed. God is the unknowable, incomprehensible background to the action. God’s motives are seldom revealed and require explanation and interpretation. The stories in the Bible certainly can be explained from the point of view of the senses, but to a man of faith they are the story of the working out of God’s will. Several examples are given to illustrate this.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectlaw
dc.subjectConstitution
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectBill of Rights
dc.subjectAmerican ideals
dc.titleAmerican Ideals 03. The Hebrew Bible, Part 2
dc.typesound
dc.description.audio1_oq7k6fi3
dc.description.legacydownloads4289avb02f01_03.mp3: 59 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationKonvitz, Milton R.: Cornell University


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