Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKonvitz, Milton R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-30T18:45:38Z
dc.date.available2020-11-30T18:45:38Z
dc.date.issued1973
dc.identifier.other7668795
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/82706
dc.descriptionDuration: 46:26
dc.description.abstractThe Stoics recognized that man is social by nature and extended the horizon of human obligations to all of humankind, where the earlier Greek philosophers as well as the Hebrews saw these obligations limited to their own societies. Stoic philosophy had a major impact on the early Church as it became a missionary religion spread by Hellenized Christians of Jewish origins, such as Stephen and Paul. The cosmopolitan and all-embracing way they presented Christ’s message was especially effective, Dr. Konvitz argues, as they brought it to the Gentile world. Mankind had a common father and that father was God. The Stoic philosopher, Epictetus, with his emphasis on freedom of the will and the brotherhood of man, is quoted at length.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectlaw
dc.subjectConstitution
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectBill of Rights
dc.subjectAmerican ideals
dc.titleAmerican Ideals 26. The Stoics, Part 3
dc.typesound
dc.description.audio1_09cw6vsr
dc.description.legacydownloads4289avb02f02_03.mp3: 53 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationKonvitz, Milton R.: Cornell University


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics