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dc.contributor.authorEqual Employment Opportunity Commission, U.S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T15:59:48Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T15:59:48Z
dc.date.issued2004-03-04
dc.identifier.other44331
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/79200
dc.description.abstractThe main purpose of this report is to use data from the 2002 EEO-1 Survey of Firms in Private Industry to explore the status of women in management. The research will develop some new ways of analyzing the EEO-1 data that focus on access to management positions generally, and perhaps more importantly, access to management positions at headquarter facilities. The primary contribution of these analyses of the EEO-1 survey is the ability to raise important problems and questions about gender-based discrimination given the wide variations in the types of firms and industries in the American economy. While this initial report on glass ceilings focuses on the status of women, the analyses developed here can be applied to examine minority groups.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectFederal
dc.subjectkey workplace documents
dc.subjectCatherwood
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectglass ceiling
dc.subjectwomen
dc.subjectstatus
dc.subjectofficials
dc.subjectmanagers
dc.subjectprivate sector
dc.subjectemployment
dc.subjectworkers
dc.subjectindustries
dc.subjectNAICS
dc.subjecteconomy
dc.titleGlass Ceilings: The Status of Women as Officials and Managers in the Private Sector
dc.typeunassigned
dc.description.legacydownloadsstatusofwomen.pdf: 938 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.


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