Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBureau of Labor Statistics
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T15:47:41Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T15:47:41Z
dc.date.issued1998-07-01
dc.identifier.other4115218
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/78951
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Women incurred less than one tenth of the job-related fatal injuries and about one-third of the nonfatal injuries and illnesses that required time off to recuperate in 1992-96. During this period women accounted for just under 50 percent of the Nation's workforce. One explanation for this large discrepancy is that women are employed in relatively less dangerous jobs such as teaching or service occupations. Few women work in the construction trades or in other high-risk jobs where work is generally performed outdoors. But if more women enter high-risk occupations their risk of injury or death may increase.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectworkplace accidents
dc.subjectdeath
dc.subjectfatalities
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectoccupational injuries
dc.titleWomen Experience Fewer Job-related Injuries and Deaths Than Men
dc.typeunassigned
dc.description.legacydownloadsWomen_Experience_Fewer_Job_related_Injuries_and_Deaths.pdf: 502 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBureau of Labor Statistics: True


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics