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dc.contributor.authorBureau of Labor Statistics
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T15:46:31Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T15:46:31Z
dc.date.issued2009-06-01
dc.identifier.other4075757
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/78924
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Work often is associated with a specific workplace—such as a factory, school, office, hospital, or other location— where people perform their jobs. In recent years, however, technological developments have provided some workers with the ability to perform their jobs at other locations. Expanded access to broadband Internet connections, wireless connectivity, and secure data networks provide workers with high-speed and secure access to work files. Internet data storage allows workers to access stored information from any Internet connection, and handheld devices such as smartphones assist in managing work-related communication from almost anywhere. These technological developments and their expansion have helped create the perception that workers today are increasingly working at locations beyond their workplace.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectworkplace
dc.subjectAmerican Time Use Survey
dc.subjecttechnology
dc.subjecttrends
dc.subjectsite
dc.subjectoffice
dc.subjecttelecommuting
dc.titleWhere People Worked, 2003 to 2007
dc.typeunassigned
dc.description.legacydownloadsJune_2009.pdf: 65 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBureau of Labor Statistics: True


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