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dc.contributor.authorBureau of Labor Statistics
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T15:46:16Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T15:46:16Z
dc.date.issued1999-07-01
dc.identifier.other4073149
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/78918
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] The average household in the United States spent just over $700 more on health care in 1997 than in 1987, $1,841 compared to $1,135, respectively. During this period, health care expenditures rose at a greater rate in the Midwest than in the other major regions. Midwestern consumer units spent 73 percent more on health care in 1997 than in 1987, compared to increases in the Northeast, South, and West of 63, 58, and 56 percent, respectively. Households in the Midwest and South spent an average of about $1,900 on health care in 1997, between 6 and 11 percent more than their counterparts in the Northeast and West.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjecthousehold
dc.subjectexpenditure
dc.subjecthealth care
dc.subjectregion
dc.subjecthealth insurance
dc.subjectmedical services
dc.subjectdrugs
dc.subjectmedical supplies
dc.subjecttrends
dc.titleWhat the Nation Spends on Health Care: A Regional Comparison
dc.typeunassigned
dc.description.legacydownloadsJuly_1999.pdf: 52 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBureau of Labor Statistics: True


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