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dc.contributor.authorMane, Ferran
dc.contributor.authorBishop, John H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:55:07Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:55:07Z
dc.date.issued2006-10-01
dc.identifier.other251930
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77341
dc.description.abstractThe paper assesses the relationship between investments in computer skills by adolescents and earnings at age 26. The heaviest investors earned 9 to 16 percent more than otherwise equivalent NELS-88 classmates. The payoff to early computer skills was substantial in jobs involving intense and complex uses of computers; negligible when computers were not used at work. It was non-gaming use of computers outside of school that enhanced future earnings, not playing video/computer games—which lowered earnings. Children in low SES families invested less in computer skills and thus benefited less from the job opportunities generated by the digital revolution.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectCAHRS
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectcenter
dc.subjecthuman resource
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjectworker
dc.subjectadvanced
dc.subjectlabor market
dc.subjectsatisfaction
dc.subjectemployee
dc.subjectwork
dc.subjectcomputer skills
dc.subjectearnings
dc.subjectpayoff
dc.subjectschool
dc.subjectvideo/computer games
dc.subjectdigital revolution
dc.titleAre Early Investments In Computer Skills Rewarded In The Labor Market?
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloadsWP06_18_Are_early_investments.pdf: 1019 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationMane, Ferran: ferran.mane@urv.cat Universitat Rovira i Virgili
local.authorAffiliationBishop, John H.: jhb5@cornell.edu Cornell University


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