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dc.contributor.authorBishop, John H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:54:58Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:54:58Z
dc.date.issued1987-03-18
dc.identifier.other207487
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77332
dc.description.abstractThe paper challenges the widespread assumption that the wage effects of federal training programs are reliable and unbiased estimates of productivity effects and social benefits. Evidence is presented that the reputations of government training programs are unreliable and that employers stigmatize those eligible for TJTC and CETA OJT contracts. Graduates of classroom training programs which are known to be funded by JTP A are likely to be similarly stigmatized. TJTC eligibles are seriously underpaid by employers and JTPA graduates may experience a similar fate. Consequently, the true effects of JTP A on the productivity of disadvantaged workers may be considerably larger than its effects on wages. Methods of obtaining estimates of productivity effects are described.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectCAHRS
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectcenter
dc.subjecthuman resource
dc.subjectevaluation
dc.subjecttraining program
dc.subjectwage
dc.subjectfederal
dc.subjectgovernment
dc.subjectemployer
dc.subjectgraduate
dc.subjectworker
dc.subjecttraining
dc.subjectproductivity
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjecthigh shcool
dc.titleToward More Valid Evaluations Of Training Programs Serving the Disadvantaged
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloads87_07_Toward_more_valid_evaluations.pdf: 280 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBishop, John H.: Cornell University


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