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dc.contributor.authorBishop, John H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:54:40Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:54:40Z
dc.date.issued1988-08-09
dc.identifier.other199215
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77314
dc.description.abstractEmployment tests predict job performance because they measure or are correlated with a large set of malleable developed abilities which are causally related to productivity. Our economy currently under-rewards the achievements that are measured by these tests. Consequently, economic incentives to study hard in high school are minimal and this absence of incentives has contributed to the low levels of achievement in math and science. The paper concludes with a discussion of ways in which employment tests can strengthen incentives to learn.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectCAHRS
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectcenter
dc.subjecthuman resource
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjectworker
dc.subjectemploy
dc.subjectvocational
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectyouth
dc.subjectrisk
dc.subjectwork
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjecttraining
dc.subjectoccupation
dc.subjectcollege
dc.titleEmployment Testing and Incentives to Learn
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloads88_12_Employment_Testing_and_Incentives_to_learn.pdf: 599 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBishop, John H.: Cornell University


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