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dc.contributor.authorBishop, John H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:54:36Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:54:36Z
dc.date.issued1988-08-24
dc.identifier.other197662
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77311
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] About half of all youth either do not complete high school or end their formal education with the high school diploma. Even higher proportions of minority, disadvantaged and handicapped youth do not enter postsecondary education. Should public schools offer these youth occupationally specific education and training? If so, what form should this education take? Should the goal of the occupational component of high school vocational education be occupationally specific skills, career awareness, basic skills or something else? What should be the relationship between programs providing occupationally specific training and the employers who hire their graduates?
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectCAHRS
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectcenter
dc.subjecthuman resource
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjectworker
dc.subjectadvanced
dc.subjectlabor market
dc.subjectsatisfaction
dc.subjectemployee
dc.subjectstudent
dc.subjectperformance
dc.subjectemployment
dc.subjectschool
dc.subjectrole
dc.subjectemploy
dc.subjectvocational
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectyouth
dc.subjectrisk
dc.subjectwork
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjecttraining
dc.subjectoccupation
dc.subjectcollege
dc.subjectexamination
dc.subjectschool
dc.subjectstudent
dc.subjectlearning
dc.subjecteconomic
dc.titleOccupational Training in High School: When Does it Pay Off?
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloads88_09_Occupational_training_in_high_school.pdf: 10305 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBishop, John H.: Cornell University


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