Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBishop, John H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:54:27Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:54:27Z
dc.date.issued1988-01-01
dc.identifier.other195759
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77302
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] The National Commission on Excellence in Education has stated, "Learning is the indispensable investment required for success in the information age we are entering." The high American standard of living has always depended on the high quality of American workers. There is no way unskilled American manufacturing workers can compete with the millions of unskilled workers of India, China and Latin America. The watchword in American manufacturing is now "AUTOMATE, MIGRATE, OR EVAPORATE." Automation, however, requires a highly skilled and flexible work force. Skilled workers are essential for the design, introduction and maintenance of the advanced manufacturing technologies that must be adopted if we are to maintain our high standard of living.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectCAHRS
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectcenter
dc.subjecthuman resource
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjectworker
dc.subjectadvanced
dc.subjectlabor market
dc.subjectskill
dc.subjectAmerican
dc.subjectGeneral Motors
dc.subjectGM
dc.subjectfms
dc.subjectJapan
dc.subjectU.S.
dc.subjecthigh school student
dc.titleWhy High School Students Learn So Little And What Can Be Done About It
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloads88_01_Why_high_school_students_learn.pdf: 1957 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBishop, John H.: Cornell University


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics