Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBishop, John H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:53:55Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:53:55Z
dc.date.issued1989-02-06
dc.identifier.other178435
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77271
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] This paper examines when and to what extent an individual's relative wage depends on his/her productivity relative to others doing the same job. Starting wages were inf1uenced by background characteristics and training cost realizations but not by relative productivity. Wages one year later were inf1uenced by productivity but the effects were small. The wage elasticity was .2 at small establishments and 0 at establishments with over 400 employees. The wage response to relative productivity and training costs was weaker in small labor markets, suggesting that wages do not fully respond to performance because of the firm specificity of job performance differentials.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectwage
dc.subjectwage rate
dc.subjectsecondary education
dc.subjectrole
dc.subjectstate government
dc.subjectAmerican
dc.subjectstudent
dc.subjectperformance
dc.subjectemployment
dc.subjectschool
dc.subjectrole
dc.subjectemploy
dc.subjectvocational
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectyouth
dc.subjectrisk
dc.subjectwork
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjecttraining
dc.subjectoccupation
dc.subjectcollege
dc.subjectexamination
dc.subjectschool
dc.subjectstudent
dc.subjectlearning
dc.subjecteconomic
dc.subjectCAHRS
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectcenter
dc.subjecthuman resource
dc.subjectstudies
dc.subjectadvance
dc.titleThe Recognition and Reward of Employee Performance
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloads89_05_The_Recognition_and_Reward.pdf: 8679 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBishop, John H.: Cornell University


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics