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dc.contributor.authorGerhart, Barry A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:53:35Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:53:35Z
dc.date.issued1990-06-01
dc.identifier.other175709
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77251
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] The importance of employee turnover control depends on many factors, including the relative supply of replacements in either the internal or external labor market, the amount of training invested in the employee, and the perfonnance level of the employee. In reference to the last factor, several authors have argued that turnover, especially of low perfonners, should not necessarily be assumed to represent a problem (Dalton, Todor, & Krackhardt, 1982; Boudreau & Berger, 1985; Hollenbeck & Williams, 1986). Thus, research is needed that identifies the conditions under which high perfonners are most likely to voluntarily leave the organization.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectCAHRS
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectcenter
dc.subjecthuman resource
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjectworker
dc.subjectadvanced
dc.subjectlabor market
dc.subjectsatisfaction
dc.subjectemployee
dc.subjectwork
dc.subjectmanage
dc.subjectmanagement
dc.subjecttraining
dc.subjectHRM
dc.subjectemploy
dc.subjectmodel
dc.subjectindustrial relations
dc.subjectlabor market
dc.subjecthealth care
dc.subjecteconomy
dc.subjectjob satisfaction
dc.subjectjob performance
dc.subjectproductivity
dc.subjectmeasurement
dc.subjectcompensation
dc.subjectpay
dc.subjectvoluntary turnover
dc.subjectsalary
dc.titleVoluntary Turnover, Job Performance, Salary Growth, and Labor Market Conditions
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloads90_12_Voluntary_turnover__job_.pdf: 4043 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationGerhart, Barry A.: Cornell University


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