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dc.contributor.authorJudge, Timothy A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:52:25Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:52:25Z
dc.date.issued1992-04-01
dc.identifier.other157965
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77172
dc.description.abstractWeitz (1952) argued that job dissatisfaction would be more predictive of turnover if it was considered in light of an individual's predisposition to be satisfied with everyday life events. In the present study it was hypothesized that affective disposition moderates the relationship between job satisfaction and voluntary turnover. Using data collected from a sample of nurses, support was indicated for the hypothesis. Individuals dissatisfied with their jobs but positively disposed to their life in general were the most likely individuals to quit. Furthermore, the relationship between job dissatisfaction and turnover was moderately strong for those with "positive" dispositions but negligible for those with "negative" dispositions.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjectsatisfaction
dc.subjectresearch
dc.subjectindividual
dc.subjectunhappy
dc.subjectdissatisfied
dc.subjectmodel
dc.subjectemployer
dc.subjectpersonality
dc.subjectsocial psychology
dc.subjectturnover
dc.subjectrelationship
dc.subjectnegative
dc.subjectpositive
dc.subjectWeitz
dc.subjectprocess
dc.subjectthought
dc.subjectdepression
dc.titleDoes Affective Disposition Moderate the Relationship Between Job Satisfaction and Voluntary Turnover?
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloadsDoes_Affective_Disposition__92_19.pdf: 7111 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationJudge, Timothy A.: Cornell University


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