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dc.contributor.authorBloom, Matthew C.
dc.contributor.authorMilkovich, George T.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:50:55Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:50:55Z
dc.date.issued1997-10-01
dc.identifier.other125511
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77021
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] We are on the verge of a worldwide restructuring of compensation and reward systems. Even long established, seemingly carved-in-granite cultural norms, such as lifetime employment in Japan and industry-wide bargaining in Germany, are weakening in response to the pressures of a global economy. So also are our previously hard-and-fast assumptions about international compensation -- the idea that pay systems should keep expatriates “economically whole” and the notion that local compensation should be tailored to fit national cultures.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectemployee
dc.subjectorganization
dc.subjectperformance
dc.subjectrisk
dc.subjectpay
dc.subjectcompensation
dc.subjectculture
dc.subjectflexibility
dc.subjectreward
dc.titleRethinking International Compensation: From Expatriate and National Cultures to Strategic Flexibility
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloadsRethinking_International_CompensationWP97_24.pdf: 8907 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBloom, Matthew C.: University of Notre Dame
local.authorAffiliationMilkovich, George T.: Cornell University


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