Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBishop, John H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T14:50:51Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T14:50:51Z
dc.date.issued1997-01-01
dc.identifier.other125490
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/77011
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Two presidents, the National Governors Association and numerous blue ribbon panels have called for the development of state or national content standards for core subjects and examinations that assess the achievement of these standards. The Competitiveness Policy Council, for example, advocates that "external assessments be given to individual students at the secondary level and that the results should be a major but not exclusive factor qualifying for college and better jobs at better wages (1993, p. 30)." It is claimed that 'curriculum-based external exit exam systems', CBEEES, based on world class content standards will improve teaching and learning of core subjects. What evidence is there for this claim? Outside the United States such systems are the rule, not the exception. What impacts have such systems had on school policies, teaching and student learning?
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectnational
dc.subjectstandard
dc.subjectstudent
dc.subjectschool
dc.subjectteach
dc.subjectachievement
dc.subjectexam
dc.subjectCBEEEs
dc.titleThe Effect of Curriculum-Based Exit Exam Systems on Student Achievement
dc.typepreprint
dc.description.legacydownloadsTheEffectofCurriculumWP97_15.pdf: 3322 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBishop, John H.: Cornell University


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics