Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSingell, Jr., Larry D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T18:37:10Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T18:37:10Z
dc.date.issued2001-08-01
dc.identifier.other379689
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/76190
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Few studies have examined whether financial aid affects college retention. This paper models the decision to enroll and re-enroll in college, which yields a bivariate probit model that is estimated using detailed individual data from a large public university. The analysis uses the unique detail of institution-specific data to examine the effect of financial aid on the re-enrollment decision, and exploits the sequential college completion process to condition the re-enrollment probabilities for college selection such that the implications are broader than is typical of a single-institution study. Overall, the results indicate that some types of need-based aid improve retention, but that merit-based aid has the largest retention effects and particularly for well-to-do enrollees.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Published by the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute, Cornell University.
dc.subjectfinancial aid
dc.subjectenrollment
dc.subjectretention
dc.subjectpublic universities
dc.titleCome and Stay a While: Does Financial Aid Effect Enrollment and Retention at a Large Public University?
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadscheri_wp18.pdf: 2672 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationSingell, Jr., Larry D.: University of Oregon


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics