Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBriggs, Vernon M. Jr.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T18:19:31Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T18:19:31Z
dc.date.issued1983-09-01
dc.identifier.other154618
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/76134
dc.description.abstract"The employment of foreign workers as a supplement to the domestic labor force has been a recurrent public policy issue throughout much of the history of the United States. Under specific circumstances, nonimmigrant workers have been allowed legal access to the American labor market. They should not be confused with illegal immigrants who do not have such a privilege. The legislative and administrative actions that have authorized non-immigrant programs traditionally have been shrouded in controversy. Policy concerns have centered upon both the economic effects of non-immigrant workers on working conditions for citizen workers and the special restrictions often imposed on non-immigrants that would be considered unfair and often illegal if applied to citizen workers."
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Reprinted from the Journal of Economic Issues by special permission of the copyright holder, the Association for Evolutionary Economics.
dc.subjectimmigrant
dc.subjectlabor
dc.subjectpolicy
dc.subjectUnited States. employ
dc.subjectworker
dc.subjectforeign
dc.subjectdomestic
dc.subjectforce
dc.subjectAmerican
dc.subjectprogram
dc.subjecteconomic
dc.subjectillegal
dc.titleNon-Immigrant Labor Policy in the United States
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsBriggs29_Non_Immigrant_Labor_Policy_in_the_United_States.pdf: 1147 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBriggs, Vernon M. Jr.: vmb2@cornell.edu Cornell University


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics