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dc.contributor.authorJuravich, Tom
dc.contributor.authorBronfenbrenner, Kate
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:29:45Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:29:45Z
dc.date.issued1998-01-01
dc.identifier.other687031
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75980
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] The free fall of union membership in the 1970s and 1980s in the U.S. private sector was checked by unionization in the public sector. In many ways the growth of public-sector employment both masked the dramatic decline of private-sector unionization and prevented the wholesale hemorrhaging of the labor movement. Although government workers comprise only 16 percent of the current workforce, workers covered by collective bargaining in the public sector currently make up approximately one-third of the membership of the AFL-CIO.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Copyright by Cornell University.
dc.subjectunions
dc.subjectorganizing
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectUSA
dc.subjectstrategy
dc.titlePreparing for the Worst: Organizing and Staying Organized in the Public Sector
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsBronfenbrenner41_preparing_for_the_worst.pdf: 2209 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationJuravich, Tom: University of Massachusetts - Amherst
local.authorAffiliationBronfenbrenner, Kate: klb23@cornell.edu Cornell University


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