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dc.contributor.authorGray, Lois S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:25:17Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:25:17Z
dc.date.issued1976-05-01
dc.identifier.other218684
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75789
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] In a time of generally declining economic activity, labor studies for college credit is a flourishing enterprise. While college enrollments are dropping, budgets being cut back, and new or marginal programs disappearing, labor studies degree programs are expanding. Why? What accounts for this new movement in higher education?
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Copyright by Labor Studies Journal. Published version posted with special permission of the copyright holder.
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectCornell University
dc.subjecteconomic activity
dc.subjectlabor studies
dc.subjectcollege credit
dc.subjectenrollment
dc.subjectbudget
dc.subjectprogram
dc.subjectdegree
dc.subjectblue collar worker
dc.subjectwhite collar worker
dc.subjectworker
dc.subjectuniversity
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjectunion
dc.subjectmember
dc.titleLabor Studies Credit and Degree Programs: A Growth Sector of Higher Education
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsGray32_labor_studies_credit_and_degree_programs.pdf: 3332 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationGray, Lois S.: lsg7@cornell.edu Cornell University


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