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dc.contributor.authorBishop, John H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:24:39Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:24:39Z
dc.date.issued1989-03-01
dc.identifier.other188628
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75756
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] The test score decline between 1967 and 1980 was large (about 1.25 grade-level equivalents) and historically unprecedented. New estimates of trend in academic achievement, of the effect of academic achievement on productivity and of trend in the quality of the work force are developed. They imply that if test scores had continued to grow after 1967 at the rate that prevailed in the previous quarter century, labor quality would now be 2.9 percent higher and 1987 GNP $86 billion higher.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Copyright by the American Economic Association. Published version posted with special permission of the copyright holder.
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectCornell University
dc.subjecthuman resource
dc.subjectstudies
dc.subjectadvance
dc.subjectemployee
dc.subjecttest score
dc.subjectdecline
dc.subjectproductivity growth
dc.subjectlabor
dc.subjectGNP
dc.subjectacademic achievement
dc.subjectnon-farm
dc.subjectbusiness sector
dc.subjectwork
dc.titleIs the Test Score Decline Responsible for the Productivity Growth Decline?
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsBishop53_Is_the_Test_Score_Decline.pdf: 1802 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBishop, John H.: jhb5@cornell.edu Cornell University


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