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dc.contributor.authorGordon, Michael E.
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Lowell
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:21:57Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:21:57Z
dc.date.issued2000-01-01
dc.identifier.other3422037
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75612
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] What power can counter the growing strength of MNCs and the forces of globalization? National governments have an important role to play, singly and together, as do international institutions of regulation such as the European Commission, the World Trade Organization, and the International Labor Organization (ILO). Equally important, we would suggest, is the countervailing power of modernized labor movements working actively at local, national, and transnational levels. Further, we suggest that in the current era, the renewal of national and local labor movements may in fact depend greatly on increased coordination with the labor movements of other countries. Transnational collaboration will be—and should be—an increasingly important feature of tomorrow's global economy.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: © Cornell University. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectlabor movement
dc.subjectglobalization
dc.subjecttransnational collaboration
dc.subjectmultinational corporations
dc.subjectlabor unions
dc.subjectparticipation
dc.titleGoing Global
dc.typeunassigned
dc.description.legacydownloadsTurner1069_Going_Global.pdf: 179 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationGordon, Michael E.: Rutgers University - Camden
local.authorAffiliationTurner, Lowell: lrt4@cornell.edu Cornell University


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