Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBell, Bradford S.
dc.contributor.authorFederman, Jessica E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:19:58Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:19:58Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-01
dc.identifier.other6899155
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75490
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade postsecondary education has been moving increasingly from the class room to online. During the fall 2010 term 31 percent of U.S. college students took at least one online course. The primary reasons for the growth of e-learning in the nation's colleges and universities include the desire of those institutions to generate new revenue streams, improve access, and offer students greater scheduling flexibility. Yet the growth of e-learning has been accompanied by a continuing debate about its effectiveness and by the recognition that a number of barriers impede its widespread adoption in higher education.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: © The Trustees of Princeton University. The Future of Children is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. All rights reserved.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/
dc.subjecte-learning
dc.subjectpostsecondary education
dc.subjectrevenue streams
dc.subjectaccess
dc.titleE-Learning in Postsecondary Education
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsBell96_E_learning_in_postsecondary_education.pdf: 2044 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBell, Bradford S.: bb92@cornell.edu Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationFederman, Jessica E.: Cornell University


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Required Publisher Statement: © The Trustees of Princeton University. The Future of Children is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. All rights reserved.

Statistics