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dc.contributor.authorBaicich, Paul
dc.contributor.authorCompa, Lance A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:18:58Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:18:58Z
dc.date.issued1985-12-01
dc.identifier.other1758901
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75415
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Officialdom's call for labor and management to cooperate is a recurring theme in American industrial life. It all seems so reasonable: instead of knocking heads, let workers and bosses put their heads together -- and knock the competition for a loop. The trouble is, it doesn't work. In steel, auto and other industries where management and labor agreed to joint participation plans, local unions are scrapping the arrangements and local union leaders who backed them are being turned out of office by angry rank-and-filers. What began as a new era of harmony is ending in disillusion. The novelty wears off, and unions still have to fight to defend their members' interests.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Copyright held by the authors.
dc.subjectworkers rights
dc.subjectlabor movement
dc.subjectunionization
dc.subjectanti-unionism
dc.subjectunion organizing
dc.titleCooperate, Hell: Unions Get What They Fight For
dc.typeunassigned
dc.description.legacydownloadsCompa145_Cooperation_Hell.pdf: 157 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBaicich, Paul: United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America
local.authorAffiliationCompa, Lance A.: lac24@cornell.edu Cornell University


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