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dc.contributor.authorBatt, Rosemary
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:16:45Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:16:45Z
dc.date.issued2003-06-01
dc.identifier.other1119537
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75217
dc.description.abstractThis paper offers a political explanation for the diffusion and sustainability of team-based work systems by examining the differential outcomes of team structures for 1200 workers, supervisors, and middle managers in a large unionized telecommunications company. Regression analyses show that participation in self-managed teams is associated with significantly higher levels of perceived discretion, employment security, and satisfaction for workers and the opposite for supervisors. Middle managers who initiate team innovations report higher employment security, but otherwise are not significantly different from their counterparts who are not involved in innovations. By contrast, there are no significant outcomes for employees associated with their participation in offline problem-solving teams.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Reprinted with permission of Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. Final version published as Batt, R. (2004). Who benefits from teams? Comparing workers, supervisors, and managers. Industrial Relations, 43(1), 183-212.
dc.subjecthuman resources
dc.subjectteams
dc.subjectemployees
dc.subjectsupervisors
dc.subjectmanagers
dc.subjectperformance
dc.titleWho Benefits From Teams? Comparing Workers, Supervisors, and Managers
dc.typearticle
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.0019-8676.2004.00323.x
dc.description.legacydownloadsBatt1_Who_Benefits_from_teams.pdf: 2876 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBatt, Rosemary: rb41@cornell.edu Cornell University


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