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dc.contributor.authorEhrenberg, Ronald G.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:16:08Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:16:08Z
dc.date.issued2003-03-01
dc.identifier.other3307476
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75156
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Most colleges and universities adopted budgets for the 2002-03 academic year in the spring and early summer of 2002. At that time, a pessimist might have cited several factors – negative rates of return from institutional endowments, a rising unemployment rate, an economic recession, and large increases in college and university enrollments, for example - to predict that faculty members would not see their earnings increase substantially in real terms in the coming year. The good news is that, overall and on average, the pessimists' worst fears proved incorrect. The bad news is that the overall aver-ages don't tell the whole story.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Originally published in Academe, the magazine of the American Association of University Professors. Copyright by the American Association of University Professors.
dc.subjectfaculty
dc.subjectsalary
dc.subjecttuition
dc.subjectbenefits
dc.subjectinfrastructure
dc.titleUnequal Progress: The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession 2002-03
dc.typeunassigned
dc.description.legacydownloadsEhrenberg102_Unequal_Progress.pdf: 66 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationEhrenberg, Ronald G.: rge2@cornell.edu Cornell University


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