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dc.contributor.authorGreer, Ian
dc.contributor.authorByrd, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorFleron, Lou Jean
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:15:59Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:15:59Z
dc.date.issued2007-01-01
dc.identifier.other231324
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75141
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Labor-community coalitions are not a new concept. Unions approach such coalitions now, as in the past, as one way to enhance their bargaining power with an employer. Such coalitions are temporary and often issue-based. In recent years, however, some local labor movements have begun to look at coalitions in a broader way – as a means of improving their public image and building power in the political arena. This broad-based approach requires the development of coalitions for the longer run, not just for temporary expediency. This paper develops the notion of a high road social infrastructure as a way to understand how union leaders develop and sustain coalitions over time and find the resources they need to succeed in shaping economic development priorities for the region.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectILR
dc.subjectCornell University
dc.subjectSeattle
dc.subjectBuffalo
dc.subjectcoalition
dc.subjectlabor
dc.subjectemployer
dc.subjectmovement
dc.subjectunion
dc.subjectunion leader
dc.subjectpolitical arena
dc.subjecteconomic development
dc.titleTwo Paths to the High Road: The Dynamics of Coalition Building in Seattle and Buffalo
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsGreerFleron2_two_paths_to_the_high_road.pdf: 2807 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationGreer, Ian: icg2@cornell.edu Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationByrd, Barbara: bbyrd@uoregon.edu University of Oregon
local.authorAffiliationFleron, Lou Jean: ljf8@cornell.edu Cornell University


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