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dc.contributor.authorCompa, Lance A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:14:56Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:14:56Z
dc.date.issued1986-09-12
dc.identifier.other839251
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/75001
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Most unions are seen as protectionist, and the label is often justified. "Stop Imports" and "Buy American" have been the main themes of many union campaigns. These sentiments stir the blood, but they are devoid of political content. They define the enemy as foreign products and, by implication, foreign workers willing to work cheaply. As long as workers abroad are seen as part of the problem, however, the American labor movement cannot solve either its trade problem or its collective bargaining crisis. Protectionism accepts the employers' premise that U.S. workers are locked in competition with third-world pay levels — a contest Americans can never win.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: ©1986 Commonweal Foundation, reprinted with permission. For subscriptions: www.commonwealmagazine.org.
dc.subjectglobalization
dc.subjecttrade
dc.subjectprotectionism
dc.subjectlabor unions
dc.subjectlabor supply
dc.subjectpublic policy
dc.subjectlabor movement
dc.titleThe Faces of Global Competition
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsCompa56_The_faces_of_global_competition.pdf: 286 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.


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