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dc.contributor.authorBriggs, Vernon M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:14:13Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:14:13Z
dc.date.issued1993-03-01
dc.identifier.other745541
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/74883
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Over the past few decades, two highly significant, yet distinctly different influences have affected the U.S. labor market: the mass movement of adult women with young children into the labor force and an upsurge in mass immigration that includes a disproportionate number of unskilled and poorly-educated women from the Third World. Among these are many who have entered illegally. Estimates of the number of unskilled domestic workers residing illegally in the United States range between 50,000 and 150,000.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Copyright by the author.
dc.subjectimmigration
dc.subjectpublic policy
dc.subjectillegal immigration
dc.subjectchild care
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjectlabor force
dc.titleA Dead-End Street: Female Immigrants and Child Care
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsBriggs75_Dead_End_Street.pdf: 449 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBriggs, Vernon M.: vmb2@cornell.edu Cornell University


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